Across the globe, people are celebrating “Tea Day” today.

There are numerous types of tea available. The Cambodia variety, a single-stem tree growing to about 16 feet (5 meters) in height, is not cultivated but has been naturally crossed with other varieties.

Nothing beats the pleasant taste and comforting aroma of a cup of tea early in the morning. Tea was discovered in China around 4,000 years ago by Emperor Nun Shen. During one of his outings to the countryside, a strong wind blew leaves from a nearby tree into a kettle of water his servants had set over a fire. The refreshing aroma prompted the Emperor to try it, and thus the first cup of tea was born.

After being brought to Europe by Dutch merchants in the 16th century, tea became a major product in the trading network established by England’s East India Company. What happened after that is, well, history.

Despite the fact that tea is believed to have been initially introduced by the Chinese during the Angkorian period, the plant never flourished, and it wasn’t until King Father Norodom Sihanouk established the sole large-scale tea production enterprise in the 1960s after importing tea plants from China.

The original scope of the ambitious project was 24 hectares. Although cultivation was temporarily halted during the 1970s as a result of the Khmer Rouge government, it resumed in the 1990s with the help of a private investor and continued until the owner apparently died in 2000, at which point the plantation was neglected.

There are numerous types of tea available. The Cambodia variety, a single-stem tree growing to about 16 feet (5 meters) in height, is not cultivated but has been naturally crossed with other varieties.

The cultural and societal benefits that tea has brought about are just as important as its flavor and health benefits. Over 13 million people rely on income from tea production, which is grown in more than 35 countries. Tea is the world’s second-most popular drink. It has about half the caffeine of coffee, plus natural antioxidant characteristics, various health benefits, and a pleasant taste.

December 15th is International Tea Day, started by trade unions in 2005, which celebrates tea’s health benefits, economic value, and cultural heritage while promoting sustainable production from fields to cups. This day aims to regulate uneven competition, safety, land occupation, social security, decent wages, and women’s rights for tea workers by uniting civil society organizations and small tea producers and businesses.

On this day, people usually hold seminars, public campaigns, and presentations. Tea is a big export crop for countries that grow it, and enthusiasts also celebrate tea culture.

“A great idea should always be left to steep like loose tea leaves in a teapot for a while to make sure that the tea will be strong enough and the idea truly is a great one.”

Phoebe Stone

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