Essence of the Dhamma is found in The Four Noble Truths.

The four noble truths are regarded as one of the Buddha’s most significant teachings in Buddhism and are acknowledged as his first teaching. (Pāli: cattāri ariyasaccāni).

According to the Buddha, these are “Noble Truths” because they are real (tathāni), infallible (avitathāni), and do not change (anaññathāni).

The Buddha’s teachings are summarized in the Four Noble Truths. The four principles were what the Buddha realized while meditating under the bodhi tree.

  • The truth of pain (Dukkha)
  • The real origin of suffering (Samudya)
  • The truth of the end of pain (Nirodha)
  • The truth of the route to pain removal (Magga)

The Buddha is referred to as “Worthy” (Arahant) and “Perfectly Enlightened by Himself” (Samma Sambuddho) because of the full understanding of these four noble truths as they really are. (SN Samm Buddh Sutta)

Many people resemble the Buddha to a physician. He diagnosed and described the root of the issue (suffering) in the first two Noble Truths.

Realising that there is a cure is the third Noble Truth.

The Eightfold Path, which the Buddha outlined in the Fourth Noble Truth, is the recommended path for achieving relief from pain.

Also, the word “Buddhism” is derived from the words “buddha,” “buddhi,” and “bodhi,” respectively. Literally, these terms mean “intelligence,” “wisdom,” “supreme knowledge,” or “intellect.”  Also, “Buddha” is also used to refer to someone who has attained enlightenment or awakening.

The wisdom and supreme knowledge that a Buddha possesses as a result of understanding the four noble truths are clearly stated here: https://bit.ly/3yvMsCS.

“We are borne along by these four different kinds of sufferings: birth, aging, sickness, and death. Our life starts with birth, which is full of pain and suffering, and ends with death, which is also suffering. Between these two, whether our life is short or long, sickness and aging keep punishing us. We are drowning in the currents of these four rivers, tossed around by strong waves.”

― Tashi Tsering, The Four Noble Truths: The Foundation of Buddhist Thought, Volume 1

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